Quiet the mind herbal tincture

Herbal tinctures are a great way to introduce yourself to the power of plant medicines. Finding healing through herbs can lead to a process that’s both curious and informative. Not to mention, the sense of empowerment that comes from making your own plant medicines paves the way for being an active participant in your health. […]

Herbal tinctures are a great way to introduce yourself to the power of plant medicines. Finding healing through herbs can lead to a process that’s both curious and informative. Not to mention, the sense of empowerment that comes from making your own plant medicines paves the way for being an active participant in your health. That in itself is both priceless and transformative.

Real quick, let’s go over what an herbal tincture is. It’s a highly concentrated herbal extract that uses alcohol as the solvent. With time, the alcohol powerfully extracts the medicinal compounds out of the plant materials.

The Quiet the Mind tincture uses a blend of herbs that calm nervous tension, ease anxiety and worry, and promote a tranquil state of mind. In Traditional Chinese Medicine we call this calming the spirit. These herbs are nourishing tonics that have the ability to ground us when the stresses we face seem to be getting the best of us.

The Herbs

Schisandra Berries: This herb is one of the biggest players in the Chinese Medical pharmacopeia for calming both the heart and the spirit. In western terms, that can be translated as promoting peace of mind and connecting you with your heart.

Skullcap: This is a great herb for anxiety and restlessness. When you’re stressed and it feels like every muscle in your body is in a knot, skullcap works from the inside out to relieve both emotional and physical tension.

Passionflower: The word that comes to mind with this herb is overworked. When you’re “tired but wired,” passionflower can promote a sense of calm that will allow you to take the deep rest that you need.

Catnip: Not just for cats. In fact, it has the opposite effect on people, acting as a natural sedative. Like the above herbs, it has a calming effect on both mind and body. It also has natural antacid properties that can help with indigestion, a common side effect of stress and worry.

You’ll also need a 16-oz mason jar with an airtight lid and four 2-oz amber tincture bottles.

This recipe was lovingly created for Instinct Wellness by Kaylie Hopper, a licensed acupuncturist and herbalist at hopperacupuncture.com

What you’ll need

  • 1 parts Catnip
  • 1 parts Schisandra Berries
  • 1 parts Dried passionflower
  • 1 parts 80-90 proof vodka, or alcohol of your choice

What to do

  1. The easiest way to measure the herbs is by using equal parts of each and filling the mason jar halfway. From there, you’ll top the jar off with alcohol, secure the lid, and store it in a cool, dark place.
  2. Shake the jar a couple times a week. If you notice that the alcohol has evaporated a bit and is no longer completely covering the herbs, go ahead and add a little more alcohol. Wait 6 weeks.
  3. Once you’ve allowed time to extract all the healing goodness out of the herbs, it’s time to bottle your tincture. Using cheesecloth, strain the decoction. Make sure you really wring out the herbs in the cheesecloth before tossing them. Now, funnel your extract into the tincture bottles. Be sure to label them so later on down the road you aren’t stuck with a mystery tincture. Because alcohol acts as a preservative, if you store your tincture in a cool, dark place, it’ll last for years.
  4. Dosage: The standard recommendation for tinctures ranges, but for this one, 1 dropper full (not to be confused with 1 drop) under the tongue a couple times a day should do the trick. You can also put the tincture into water or tea if you prefer, although I do find that taking the tincture on it’s own is more effective.
  5. Note: Avoid taking this tincture if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

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